Episode 3.3 - Seondeok

Seondeok was Queen of the Silla kingdom of Korea, one of three separate, often warring, kingdoms on the peninsula. She led Silla through a time where it's very existence was threatened, and began to set it on the path to dominance that would bear fruit soon after her death.

Sources:

  • Lee Ki-baik, A New History of Korea. Translated by Edward Wagner, 1984.
  • Tae-Don Noh, "A Study of Koguryŏ Relations Recorded in the Silla Annals of the Samguk Sagi", Korean Studies, 2004
  • Chong Sun Kim, "Silla Economy and Society", Korean Studies, 2004
  • Chong Sun Kim, "Sources of Cohesion and Fragmentation in the Silla Kingdom", Journal of Korean Studies, 1969.
  • Ancient History Encyclopedia, Marc Cartwright, "Queen Seondeok"

Names Mentioned:

Episode 3.2 - Ardashir I

Ardashir rose from being the commander of a fortress in southern Persia to leading the Persian overthrow of the Parthian dynasty. He created the Sassanid Persian Empire, which lasted 4 centuries and greatly influenced culture in the region even to this day.

Sources:

  • Ehsan Yarshater (ed.), Encyclopædia Iranica,
  • Touraj Daryaee, "Ardaxsir and the Sassanians' Rise to Power", 2010
  • The Cambridge History of Iran, Chapter 4, The Political History of Iran Under the Sasanians
  • The Cambridge Ancient History, Chapter 14, The Sassanians
  • Cassius Dio, Historia Romana
  • Siamak Adhami, "A Question of Legitimacy: The Case of Ardasir I", The Indo-Iranian Journal, 2003
  • Matthew Canepa, "Technologies of Memory in Early Sasanian Iran: Achaemenid Sites and Sasanian Identity", American Journal of Archaeology, 2010
  • Dalia Levit-Tawil, "The Sasanian Rock Relief at Darabgird - A Re-Evaluation", Journal of Near Easter Studies, 1992

Names Mentioned:

Episode 3.1 - Suppiluliuma

Suppiluliuma was the greatest king of the Hittites, and helped turn the Anatolian kingdom into perhaps the most powerful empire in the world for a time. 

Sources:

  • Trevor Bryce, The Kingdom of the Hittites, 2005
  • Trevor Bryce, "Some Observations on the Chronology of Suppiluliuma's Reign", Anatolian Studies, 1989
  • W Richard Stephens, Jr, "The Rise of the Hittite Empire: A Comparison of Theories on the Origin of the State", Mid-American Review of Sociology, 1979
  • Gregory McMahon, “The History of the Hittites”, The Biblical Archaeologist
  • Claudia Glatz and  Roger Matthews. “Anthropology of a Frontier Zone: Hittite-Kaska Relations in Late Bronze Age North-Central Anatolia”, Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research, Aug 200
  • Hittites, 2003. Tolga Ornek. Documentary

Names Mentioned:

Episode 3.0 - Season 3 Intro

The Almost Forgotten Podcast has returned for season 3! This, however, is just an intro... but don't worry, thanks to one listener we follow-up on the family and House of the last subject from last season.

After that, this season, we'll continue with the single episodes about almost forgotten individuals, until we finish up the season with a multi-parter that started out as the typical episode and then grew into 6 episodes.

instead of one person per episode, the first 5 episodes will be about 5 almost forgotten.

Thanks again for listening, subscribing on iTunes and supporting the podcast!

Episode 2.10 - Eugene of Savoy

Despite being born in one of the most powerful families in France, court intrigues kept Prince Eugene of Savoy from being able to join the military. So he left for Vienna before the age of 20 to join the Austrian military. He spent the next 50 years commanding forces for the Holy Roman Empire, became one of France's greatest enemies, and Austria's greatest general

Sources:

  • G.B. Malleson, Prince Eugene of Savoy
  • Paul R. Sweet, "Prince Eugene of Savoy and Central Europe." The American Historical Review, 1951
  • Kenneth P Czech, "War of Spanish Succession: Battle of Turin." Military History, 1998
  • Ciro Paoletti, "Prince Eugene of Savoy, the Toulon Expedition of 1707, and the English Historians." The Journal of Military History, 2006
  • Winston Churchill, Marlborough, His Life and Times, 1933

Names Mentioned:

Episode 2.9 - Jayavarman VII

Jayavarman VII was a prince who saw his empire invaded and his capital sacked. He became king and expanded the Khmer Empire greatly, perhaps bringing it to its greatest territorial extent. He also left a legacy of architectural wonders that attract visitors today.

Sources:

  • Lawrence Palmer Briggs, The Ancient Khmer Empire, 1951
  • George Coedes, The Indianized States of Southeast Asia, 1968

Names Mentioned:

Episode 2.8 - Arwa al-Sulayhi

Queen Arwa al-Sulayhi managed to rule Yemen as a regent and then as the official queen for over a half a century in total. In that time, she was a strong ruler and administrator, despite the fact that the time she lived, in addition to the culture, was unused to women in power. She became the patron for a branch of Islam that survives today thanks to her efforts.

Sources:

  • Fatema Mernissi, The Forgotten Queen of Islam, 1993
  • Dr Farhad Daftary, "Sayyida Hurra: The Isma'ili Sulayhid Queen of Yemen." Women in the Medieval Islamic World, 1998

Names Mentioned:

Episode 2.7 - Clovis

Clovis united the Franks and helped solidify them as the dominant power in northwestern Europe after the collapse of the Roman Empire. He created the first Kingdom of France and also helped built out what would becomes Charlemagne's Empire.

Sources

  • Bernard Bachrach, Merovingian Military Organization, 1972
  • Ralph Mathison, Clovis, Anastasius, and Political Status in 508 CE, 2012
  • Charles Oman, The Dark Ages, 476-918, 1898
  • Ian Wood, The Merovingian Kingdoms 450-751, 1994

Names Mentioned

Episode 2.6 - Zhang Qian

Zhang Qian was sent by the Han Chinese emperor to enlist the help of a distant nation in war against a common enemy. Zhang was unable to form an alliance, instead, he formed the relationships and pathways that led directly to the silk road, connecting China to the west and, eventually, to Rome.

Sources:

  • Sima Qian, Shiji (Records of the Grand Historian), 1st Century BC
  • Friedrich Hirth, "The Story of Chang K'ien, China's Pioneer in Western Asia: Text and Translation of Chapter 123 of Ssi-ma Ts'ien's Shi-Ki," Journal of the American Oriental Society, 1917
  • Cambridge History of China, Volume 1, Chapters 2 and 6, 1986
  • Xinru Liu, Journal of World History, Migration and Settlement of the Yuezhi-Kushan: Interaction and Interdependence of Nomadic and Sedentary Societies, 2001
  • Walter Perceval Yetts, "Chinese Contact with Luristan Bronzes", The Burlington Magazine for Connoisseurs, August 1934

Names mentioned:

Episode 2.5 - The Diadochi Part 5 - Seleucus, Ptolemy and the End

The surviving diadochi, Ptolemy and Seleucus, continue to battle with their neighboring Hellenistic Kingdoms. Their empires, as well as the Kingdom of Macedon, continue on for more than a century, before decline and eventual destruction at the hands of the Romans

Sources:

  • Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotecha Historica (Library of History)
  • James Romm, Ghost on the Throne: The Death of Alexander the Great and the Bloody Fight for His Empire
  • Robin Waterfield, Dividing the Spoils: The War for Alexander the Great's Empire
  • Arrian, Events After Alexander
  • Plutarch, Parallel Lives
  • Polyaenus, Strategems

Names Mentioned

Episode 2.4 - The Diadochi Part 4 - All Against Antigonus

Antigonus rules all of Asia, but chasing out Seleucus giving Ptolemy and the others an opportunity to check his power

Sources:

  • Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotecha Historica (Library of History)
  • James Romm, Ghost on the Throne: The Death of Alexander the Great and the Bloody Fight for His Empire
  • Robin Waterfield, Dividing the Spoils: The War for Alexander the Great's Empire
  • Arrian, Events After Alexander
  • Plutarch, Parallel Lives
  • Polyaenus, Strategems

Names Mentioned:

Episode 2.3 - The Diadochi Part 3 - Eumenes and Antigonus

After the death of Perdiccas, Antigonus chases Eumenes halfway across the empire. Meanwhile, in Greece and Macedon, a fight begins over Antipater's position after he dies

Sources:

  • Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotecha Historica (Library of History)
  • James Romm, Ghost on the Throne: The Death of Alexander the Great and the Bloody Fight for His Empire
  • Robin Waterfield, Dividing the Spoils: The War for Alexander the Great's Empire
  • Arrian, Events After Alexander
  • Plutarch, Parallel Lives
  • Polyaenus, Strategems

Names Mentioned:

Episode 2.2 - The Diadochi Part 2 - Perdiccas and Eumenes

Perdiccas uses his role as the regent to the Macedonian kings to try to consolidate power. But the other Diadochi - Ptolemy in Egypt, Antipater in Europe, and Antigonus in Anatolia -  have plans of their own

Sources:

  • Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotecha Historica (Library of History)
  • James Romm, Ghost on the Throne: The Death of Alexander the Great and the Bloody Fight for His Empire
  • Robin Waterfield, Dividing the Spoils: The War for Alexander the Great's Empire
  • Arrian, Events After Alexander
  • Plutarch, Parallel Lives
  • Polyaenus, Strategems

Names Mentioned

Big thanks to listener Peter Rojas for adding us to his list of his favorite history podcasts!
https://medium.com/@peterrojas/my-favorite-history-podcasts-c60f3a3ce1ed#.9wx808jf1

 

Episode 2.1 - The Diadochi Part 1 - Partitions and Alliances

The Diadochi were the successors to Alexander the Great. Upon his early and surprising death, with no obvious heir, his leading generals fought over his empire.

Sources:

  • Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotecha Historica (Library of History)
  • James Romm, Ghost on the Throne: The Death of Alexander the Great and the Bloody Fight for His Empire
  • Robin Waterfield, Dividing the Spoils: The War for Alexander the Great's Empire
  • Plutarch, Parallel Lives
  • Polyaenus, Strategems

Names Mentioned

Episode 2.0 - Returning for Season 2

The Almost Forgotten Podcast is returning! A new episode is coming soon (hopefully first week in January). 

This season, instead of one person per episode, the first 5 episodes will be about 5 almost forgotten people who all played a major part in the same story...

After that, the remaining episodes for the season will single episodes about almost forgotten individuals

Thanks again for listening, subscribing on iTunes and supporting the podcast!

Episode 1.10 - John III Sobieski

John III Sobieski was a Polish general who became king, stopped the last great Ottoman push into Central Europe, and saved his country numerous times

Sources:

  • Miltiades Varvounis, Jan Sobieski: The King Who Saved Europe
  • The New Cambridge Medieval History, Ch 22 & 28
  • The New Cambridge Modern History, Ch 8 & 12

Names Mentioned:

Episode 1.9 - Hayreddin Barbarossa

Hayreddin Barbarossa was a Turkish pirate who helped expand the Ottoman Empire west, turned from corsair to admiral, built the Ottoman Navy, and helped change the balance of power in the Mediterranean.

Sources

  • Ernle Bradford, The Sultan's Admiral
  • E. Hamilton Currey, Sea-Wolves of the Mediterranean
  • Islands and Military Orders, c.1291-c.1798, Ed: Simon Phillips
  • Kenneth Setton, A History of the Crusades

Names Mentioned

Episode 1.8 - Paramesawara

Parameswara was the last prince of a once-mighty empire that went on to found a powerful maritime, trade-based kingdom

Sources:

  • The Malay Annals
  • Tomé Pires, Suma Oriental que trata do Mar Roxo até aos Chins
  • William J. Bernstein, A Splendid Exchange
  • Philip D. Curtin, Cross-Cultural Trade in World History
  • The Cambridge History of Southeast Asia, Ed. Nicholas Tarling

Names Mentioned:

Episode 1.7 - Enrico Dandolo

Enrico Dandolo was a Doge of Venice who helped usher in several centuries of Venetian dominance in the eastern Mediterranean, and the destruction of the Byzantine Empire.

Sources:

  • Thomas Madden, Enrico Dandolo and the Rise of Venice
  • Roger Crowley, City of Fortune
  • Jonathan Phillips, The Fourth Crusade and the Sack of Constantinople

Names Mentioned:

Episode 1.6 - Otto the Great

Episode 1.6 is about Otto the Great. Otto I was the King of Saxony, King of East Francia, and eventually, the Holy Roman Emperor. His re-establishment of the Empire set it on a path to essentially be a continuous empire for the next 1,000 years.

Sources:

  • Timothy Reuter, Germany in the Middle Ages c. 800-1056
  • James Westfall Thompson, Feudal Germany
  • Karl Leyser, "The Battle of Lech. A Study in 10th Century Warfare", History
  • Karl Leyser, "Ottonian Government", The Journal of Historical Review
  • Gerhardt B Ladner, "The Holy Roman Empire of the Tenth Century and East Central Europe", The Polish Review

Names Mentioned: